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Here some candle-burning tips and hopefully the answers some of your questions.
All of our container candles are reuseable for whatever you want...pencil holder, candy jar, potpouri, spices, tealights, drinking tumbler...you name it. To clean out any unused wax, carefully pour hot water inside the jar to loosen the wax from the sides. Once loosened remove the wax with a slotted tool, through a strainer, whatever is most comfortable to you. Don't pour wax down your drain. Once all the wax is removed, wipe the container as clean as possible and then run it through the dishwasher for a sparkling clean jar.

Receive a free candle tool with any wood wicked candle purchase. As with any wood fire, occasionally the flame will get lazy and need a little "stoking". Boost it back up with this wick stoker. You can also use this tool as a wick dipper for cotton wicks and to help clean wax from the edges into the pool of wax if necessary.

Most important thing - If one of the wicks goes out, do not dig out the wax around it and relight. Big mistake. Let the other wick/wicks burn the wax down until the remaining unlit wick is visible at least 1/4th inch above the melt pool and then relight it. If you have the patience,let it melt down slowly until the unlit wick is above the wax pool. Or remove unmelted wax across the candle to level the top to expose all wicks evenly at least 1/4 inch above wax level.

If the wooden wick starts to dim, it may need a little stoking. Gently tap the burned edges to get the flame back up. If the wooden wick won't stay lit, you need to remove some of the wax so that the wick is a little more exposed to keep a nice flame.

And now, sort of like the safety instructions they give you on a flight, there are a few things that are standard when it comes to burning a candle that you've heard many times before:

Always burn candles on protected, heat-resistant surfaces designed for candle use.

Discontinue burning candle before the wax level reaches the bottom. Burning the wax below 1/2" level may cause the container to break or burn.

Extinguish all candles when leaving the room or before going to sleep. Never leave a burning candle unattended.

Keep candles out of the reach of children and pets. Do not place lighted candles where they can be knocked over by children, pets, or anyone/anything else.

Keep burning candles away from anything flammable, such as furniture, drapes, bedding, carpets, books, flammable decorations, kitchen cabinets,, etc.

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Why does one wick stop burning and the other/others stay lit?

When making natural soy candles with fir needle powder, a lot of things are unstable, especially air bubbles. We do everything we can to help prevent this from happening and repair it if it is visible, but some get by us.

When the candle is poured and cooling, air bubbles (sometimes not even visible to the naked eye) are gathering and rising to the top. However, the candle is cooling from the outside in including from the top down. So, when the top is too hard to allow bubbles to pop up and out, they become trapped under the surface. Typically, the air bubbles gravitate upward toward a wick and shimmy up so that most of the air pockets are near one of the wicks. Once that wick is lit it begins to melt the wax on the top around it. If the sink hole opens up before all of the wick melt pools have joined, the melt pool around the wick with the air pocket gets drained down in to the sink hole created by the air bubbles leaving the wick exposed to burn lower than the other wick melt pools. When the other wick's pools burn across to the lower burning wick, it gets drowned out. Hence, no matter how many times you dig that wick out and light it the other wicks will always drown it eventually. So, the solution is what is described above. Either remove enough wax from all wicks so that the melt pool will be even or let the other wicks burn down the wax until the one in the sink hole appears on its own again.

Someone asked if the fir needles are a fire hazard in the candle. The answer to that is "No, the flame is." Candles are a very safe product. They only become a hazard when improperly used. Fires or injuries involving candles are not caused by the candles, but by people using them in an unsafe manner. You are responsible for the safe use of any candle. With that in mind, we have included some candle-burning tips here and hope we have answered some of your questions.